THE WRITING AT THE FOOT OF THE MAP READS:

 “THIS IS MR. ELMES`S MAP DIFFERING FROM MR. KILLALLY`S ONLY IN THE RED LINE.

  1. MONK`S REPORT HAS NOT BEEN MADE PUBLIC BUT MR. MONTGOMERY WILL HAVE ACCESS TO IT.

THERE ARE SOME THINGS IN THE REPORT OF MR.MONK`S WHICH REQUIRE CORRECTION.”

 

THE IMPRINTED INFORMATION READS:

JAMES ELMES ARCHITECT & ENGINEER 29 CHARLOTTE ST., PORTLAND PLACE. APRIL17, 1821.

THE RT. HONOURABLE THE EARL OF BLESSINGTON ETC. ETC. ETC.

DRAWN ON STONE BY I. BAKER, SYDENHAM KENT.

PRINTED BY D. REDMAN, MAIDEN LANE COVENT GARDEN, LONDON

 

The Bolivar

Another most interesting fact worth recalling was that the Earl of Blessington and Lady Blessington were intimately acquainted with the famous poets Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Byron had a schooner named the Bolivar which Lord Blessington purchased from him for the sum of 400 guineas.  The proceeds of which helped Byron in his efforts to pursue liberty and peace in Greece.

Presumably Lord Byron was deeply influenced and highly motivated by Simon Bolivar 1783 – 1830, the South American liberator and revolutionary leader.  He was the first president of Bolivia which became independent of Spain in 1824 and gave his name to the country.

Bolivar was known as “El Liberator” or the “George Washington of South America.” In naming his schooner Bolivar it is easier to understand a fragment of Byron`s thinking.  Perhaps, in a romantic light, he considered himself “El Liberator” with idealistic desires of justice and freedom for oppressed nations and their people.

After selling his schooner to Charles Gardiner, he bought another vessel called “The Hercules” and set sail for Greece. He was already elected onto the Greek Committee, a small body of influential liberals who had taken up the cause of liberation in Greece. The companionships of the Blessingtons with the literary elite of the day were absolutely astonishing, to say the least.  Byron, Shelley and Dickens were in this circle of friendships.

*It is a possibility that this schooner, the Bolivar, which now belonged to the Earl of Blessington (Charles Gardiner), might have sailed up the Strabane Canal, at one time.